The Taman Tugu Project is a not-for-profit corporate social responsibility (“CSR”) initiative led by Khazanah Nasional Berhad (“Khazanah”) with the support of various public sector agencies and civil-society organisations.

The scope and costing of the project have been through many iterations based on feedback from key stakeholders, engagement with the public sector as well as budget availability. The Project currently entails the following 2 components:

1Taman Tugu
Conserving a 66-acre green-lung in the heart of Kuala Lumpur and turning it into an urban forest park for the community;
 
2National Public Trust
Establishing a public trust to own, manage and protect Taman Tugu as well as other potential assets of heritage value – including our natural heritage.
 

Taman Tugu

The urban forest park will offer a fresh public green space for the community to use, to enjoy, to experience, to own.

Located next to Tugu Negara, the forest trails are in serene environment with more than 5,000 indigenous trees.

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The urban forest park will offer a fresh public green space for the community to use, to enjoy, to experience, to own.

Located next to Tugu Negara, the forest trails are in serene environment with more than 5,000 indigenous trees.

MORE INFO

National Public Trust

The Trust, incorporated as Amanah Warisan Negara (“AWAN”), will initially focus on owning, managing, and protecting Taman Tugu into perpetuity.

It will eventually undertake more projects involving heritage assets of national significance.

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The Trust, incorporated as Amanah Warisan Negara (“AWAN”), will initially focus on owning, managing, and protecting Taman Tugu into perpetuity.

It will eventually undertake more projects involving heritage assets of national significance.

MORE INFO

10 POINTS ON TAMAN TUGU

From a Commercial Enterprise To a Social Project
1.
The 66-acre Taman Tugu site, was initially brought to Khazanah’s attention as a proposal to be converted into a for-profit tourist attraction theme-park. At the same time, other developers were pursuing the land for commercial development purposes.
2.
Based on feedback from various communities and engagements with organisations such as the Malaysian Nature Society (“MNS”), Khazanah motioned to convert the site into a public park and protect the secondary forest contained within it.
Part of the forest trails that is currently opened to the public
One of the gazebos which was a winning entry from a design competition
Preserving and Conserving the Site
3.
In partnership with the Forest Research Institute of Malaysia (“FRIM”), up to 1,000 trees within the site have been identified and tagged for preservation. These include indigenous species such as Jelutong, Tembusu, Pulai, and Gaharu some measuring more than 1-meter in diameter and potentially over 100-years old.
4.
More than 4,000 trees averaging 8 – 10 years old, consisting of more than 230 indigenous Malaysian rainforest species are being planted within the site. These trees, sourced from nurseries, include 1,000 trees which are categorized as “Endangered” or “Critically Endangered” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (“IUCN”) such as the Keruing, Meranti, and Mersawa species. For the listing of trees, please click here.
A tagged Jelutong tree
A tagged Tembusu tree
> 4,000 trees being added
A tagged Pulai tree
5.
One of the criteria in selecting the trees being added is the type of fauna they will attract. An increase in fauna will enhance the biodiversity of the site and promote the ecosystem including natural pollination. If this happens well, the site will eventually have more than 200 trees per acre – similar to a rainforest.
6.
The trails are created in a “discoverable” manner ensuring that none of the FRIM tagged trees are compromised. As we discover trails, we realised that the site had become an illegal dumping ground. Thus far, we have removed more than 150 truckloads of rubbish consisting of construction debris, household rubbish and even needles believed to have been left by substance abusers who frequented the site.
The nursery in Tg. Malim where the new trees were sourced from
Construction debris and household rubbish cleared from the site
The Site Before This
7.
As you walk the trails you will notice quite a number of palm oil trees. These are believed to have been brought in by the British prior to independence when the site was home to British residences. The British initially brought in the palm oil seeds from West Africa and planting it for ornamental purposes.
8.
After independence, the site was home to Malaysia government officials including Malaysia’s 1st Lord President, Malaysia’s 1st Director of Agriculture and Finance Minister Tun Tan Siew Sin. The site eventually was home to government quarters and you will see the footprints of these quarters as concrete slabs along the trails.
9.
As a legacy of homes of British, Malaysian officers, and employee quarters, the Taman Tugu site is home to a madrasah, Madrasah Bustanul Ulum, and 4 Hindu shrines to cater for those who used to live in the area. In keeping to one of the principles in creating this forest park, which is not displacing current residents, we are rebuilding a bigger and more enhanced Surau-Jumaat and Hindu Temple within the site for the respective committees to move to. The existing Madrasah and Hindu shrines will then be part of the forest park. In addition to the Madrasah and Hindu shrines, Institute of Strategic and International Studies (“ISIS”) Malaysia and Persatuan Perkhidmatan Tadbir dan Diplomatik (“PPTD”) are also current residents of the Taman Tugu site which we will retain at their current location.
Footprints of abandoned government quarters can be found throughout
Remnants of the homes of government officials
Protecting Into Perpetuity
10.
The 66-acre Taman Tugu site will be transferred into Amanah Warisan Negara (“AWAN”) to be managed and protected into perpetuity as a public green space. AWAN is a national public trust incorporated with a longer term objective to undertake more projects that involve the rejuvenation, rehabilitation and/or operations of selected public spaces together with heritage assets of national significance – as inspired by the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty or commonly known as the National Trust UK.
Members of the public before starting a guided trail walk
Members of the public at one of the more popular photo spots

 

Why the Taman Tugu Project?

Reducing our carbon footprint

Conserving a 66-acre secondary forest; Preserving ~1,000 trees on site; Adding >4,000 new rainforest trees; all in the heart of the city.

Adding to public social-recreational spaces

A new outdoor green space with more than 7km of forest trails to explore and escape the hustle and bustle of the city.

Appreciating our rainforests better

With more than 5000 indigenous Malaysian rainforest trees, consisting of about 500 species, Taman Tugu is a natural outdoor classroom that helps you appreciate our rainforest better.

Improving places of worship for the community

Enhanced Surau Jumaat and Hindu Temple to replace existing ones which were built decades ago.

Generating up to RM400m per annum for the local economy

This is assuming 10% of tourists to KL stays an extra ½-a-day.

Protecting our heritage assets

The incorporation of Amanah Warisan Negara (“AWAN”) provides an avenue for protecting and better managing our heritage assets into perpetuity.

Taman Tugu Project Timeline

2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
General

Conceptualisation and approvals

Project launch

Public engagement and rakyat touch points

Urban Forest Park

Identification of nurseries and preparation of trees at nurseries

Construction of structures on park site

Landscaping and forest regeneration on Taman Tugu park site

Preview Forest Trails

Surau-Jumaat Community Area, Hindu Temple and Park Maintenance Office

Campsite and Remaining Forest Trails

Observatory Deck, Café and Retail, Elevated Forest Walk, Lake, Wetland Area, Water Play Area, Parking and F&B Area, and Indoor Events Space

Connectors

Detailed feasibility studies and identification of exact connector routes and landing points

Construction of connectors

All connectors

Khazanah ILMU

Detailed feasibility studies, architectural design and space planning

Construction of Khazanah ILMU

Landscaping and forest regeneration on Khazanah ILMU site

Khazanah ILMU

National Public Trust

Drafting of Trust Deed

Appointment of Trustees and submission of Trust Deed

Incorporation of Trust

Tabling of National Trust Bill