FAQ

Updated on 18/11/2016

  1. What is the Taman Tugu Project all about?
  2. What are the plans for the park?
  3. Where is the Taman Tugu site? Does it include Tugu Negara or Taman Botani Perdana?
  4. Why do we need another green area in the city?
  5. Who will be responsible for maintenance of the park after it is completed? How will it be sustained?
  6. Who owns/ will own the park? What does it mean that it will be held in trust?
  7. What security considerations have been taken into account for the Taman Tugu Project?
  8. What are the "connectors" all about?
  9. What are the key benefits of the Taman Tugu Project?
  10. How will contracts be awarded for the Taman Tugu Project?
  11. What is the role of MNS and FRIM in the Taman Tugu Project?

  1. What is the Taman Tugu Project all about?

    • The Taman Tugu Project is a multi-component not-for-profit corporate social responsibility (“CSR”) initiative led by Khazanah Nasional Berhad in collaboration with Dewan Bandaraya Kuala Lumpur (“DBKL”) with the support of various stakeholders including Ministry of Federal Territories, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Economic Planning Unit (“EPU”), Public Private Partnership Unit (“UKAS”), Forest Research Institute of Malaysia (“FRIM”) and Malaysian Nature Society (“MNS”).

    On an overall basis, up to RM650 million has been set aside for the project covering the following components:

    1. Conserving and activating a 66-acre urban forest park (~RM190m), this includes:
      • Preservation of approximately 800 existing trees on the site
      • Enhancement of the green by adding more than 4,000 Malaysian Rainforest Trees – sourced from nurseries across Malaysia.
      • Walking and running trails around the site; along the lake, streams and hills
      • Children play areas including a water play area
      • A KL skyline observation tower and a hanging bridge
      • Action outdoor activities such as zip-lines
      • Events spaces and camping grounds
      • Parking bays spread over three locations and connecting buggy services
      • Lakeside food court serving Malaysian delicacies
      • Rebuilding an existing Surau Jumaat and Hindu Temple
      • Rainforest Education Centre to facilitate better learning and appreciation of our rainforests
      • Safety and security features; accessibility for the less-abled
    2. Connecting the surrounding area (~RM175m) – approximately 2-kilometers of sheltered pedestrian friendly walkways covering:
      • Walkway from the Bank Negara KTM Komuter Station to the main entrance of Taman Tugu
      • Underpass from Taman Tugu to Taman Botani Perdana
      • Connecting paths from KL Sentral to Muzium Negara and Taman Botani Perdana
    3. Development of a learning and innovation centre (~RM185m) which will include:
      • Public library for various age and interest groups
      • Public art gallery and display spaces
      • Co-working and maker spaces
      • Study areas and collaborative spaces
      • Auditoriums and rooms for continuous learning programmes
      • Programming and mobilisation up to 2030
    4. Establishment of a National Public Trust including operations, maintenance, partnerships and community development up to 2030 (RM100m) – this covers:
      • Establishment of a public trust to preserve the 66-acre forest park (component-1 above) as a public green space into perpetuity.
      • The RM100m set aside will also cover all operations, maintenance, partnerships and community development for the urban forest park until 2030.
      • The National Public Trust is being set-up such that other assets of national heritage importance requiring protection can be included.

  2. What are the plans for the park?

    The plan is to regenerate an urban rainforest park with facilities and activities which are engaging to various communities.

    The site is currently a secondary forest which is neither readily accessible nor safe for the public. Secondary forests generally have a much lower biodiversity of plants and animals compared to a primary forest. Approximately 800 good trees on the site have been identified and tagged for preservation. Additionally, at least 4,000 Malaysian rainforest trees suited to the site will be planted allowing it to eventually mature into a sustainable rainforest ecosystem. Wild bushes and trees which are rotting or decaying will be removed.

    The Taman Tugu Project will also ensure that the public can access and enjoy the site by providing facilities such as walking and running trails, a rainforest education center, play areas for children, food and beverage outlets as well as other outdoor activities.

    The site also houses the Club house for the Persatuan Perkhidmatan Tadbir dan Diplomatik Malaysia (“PPTD”), office of the Malaysian Institute of Strategic and International Studies, a Surau and Hindu shrines – all of which will be maintained on site.

  3. Where is the Taman Tugu site? Does it include Tugu Negara or Taman Botani Perdana?

    The Taman Tugu site is currently a non-accessible 66-acre site located behind Tugu Negara. While it does not involve the Tugu Negara site itself or the existing Taman Botani Perdana, it will be connected via an underpass to Taman Botani Perdana, creating a contiguous green space of about 290 acres.

  4. Why do we need another green area in the city?

    An important but sometimes ignored essential components of an appealing and healthy urban environment is a well-designed and maintained network of city parks. Parks like Taman Botani Perdana Taman Tasik Titiwangsa and the soon to emerge, Taman Tugu, play an important role in supporting public health, the environment, education and foster a strong sense of community. Parks make our cities sustainable, liveable and vibrant.

    By enhancing this green lung right in the midst of our capital city and making it publically accessible for free, the community can readily experience and appreciate one of our greatest heritages – our rainforest.

  5. Who will be responsible for maintenance of the park after it is completed? How will it be sustained?

    After Taman Tugu becomes operational in 2018, it will be transferred into a public trust for perpetuity. The appointed Board of Trustees will engage a professional management body to operate and maintain the park – this includes raising funds, day-to-day maintenance and upkeep of the park.

    In conceptualising the park, a business planning and financial modelling exercise has been conducted to ensure that the park component of the Taman Tugu Project can be operated and maintained in an independent, professional and sustainable manner.

    An allocation has also been provided for the operations and maintenance of the park up to 2030. This has been factored based on the business planning and financial modelling exercise conducted which takes into account components such as salaries, utilities, security, cleaning, general upkeep, wear-and-tear and activation programming costs.

  6. Who owns/ will own the park? What does it mean that it will be held in trust?

    The 66-acre park component of the Taman Tugu Project is currently federal government land and will be transferred into a public trust. The establishment of a public trust and transferring ownership of Taman Tugu into this trust allows it to be professionally managed in a sustainable manner moving forward.

  7. What security considerations have been taken into account for the Taman Tugu Project?

    Firstly, security considerations are incorporated into the design of all components including the park, the connectors and the learning and innovation centre. This includes ensuring clear lines of sight, eliminating blind spots and incorporating natural surveillance and perimeters throughout the park as well as for any children’s play areas within the park.

    Additionally, measures such as surveillance systems and on-the-ground security personnel have been incorporated into the business planning of all components. Security of all visitors is a key consideration and will continue to be refined as the Taman Tugu Project is developed.

  8. What are the "connectors" all about?

    The Taman Tugu Project is more than just a park, the project also entails enhancing covered pedestrian connectors between Taman Tugu and its surrounding areas as well as between historical landmarks, cultural sites, green spaces and transportation hubs including a pedestrian connector from KL Sentral to Taman Botani Perdana via Muzium Negara.

    The connectors, targeted for completion by 2019, are part of a collective effort to stitch the urban fabric of the city and make it more pedestrian friendly.

  9. What are the key benefits of the Taman Tugu Project?

    The Taman Tugu Project complements the 11th Malaysia plan and will play a role in enhancing and transforming Kuala Lumpur into a world-class city by 2020. Benefits include:

    Environmental

    • In July 2016, the Malaysian Cabinet approved for Lot-PT88 (66-acre site behind Tugu Negara) to be transferred into a public trust and reserved as a green public space for perpetuity. The plot is a prime piece of land that may appear attractive from a real-estate development point of view and has been valued at approximately RM2.1Billion. All good trees on the site (approximately 800 as tagged by FRIM) will be preserved and enhanced with an additional 4,000 Malaysian rainforest trees.

    Social/ Recreational

    • The project entails activating the site with recreational facilities which will be free to use by the Malaysian public – this includes water play areas and playgrounds for children, walking and running trails, picnic areas and camping grounds for school/youth groups. The park will include sufficient shaded areas, proper security features, disabled access, parking and facilities such as showers and locker rooms such that it can be enjoyed by various communities throughout the day. This provides an additional space which promotes a healthy lifestyle where the rakyat can go to outside of shopping malls.
    • The project will also include a new Surau Jumaat (2,200-pax + spill-over space for up to 600-pax) to replace the existing surau (1,000-pax maximum) which is over-crowded especially during Sembahyang Jumaat . The surau is widely used by the community around the Taman Tugu site especially as it is walking distance from BNM, JKR, LPP, ASWARA and the upcoming Asia School of Business. The existing 4 Hindu shrines/temples within the 66-acre site will also be rebuilt and enhanced. The Surau and Temple will serve the Muslim and Hindu community better.
    • The major deck from KL Sentral to Taman Botani Perdana will provide those working and living in the KL Sentral area with much easier access to Taman Botani Perdana – allowing them to enjoy the green public recreational space on a daily basis.

    Educational

    • Provide the community with an additional public library for various age and interest groups, study areas and collaborative spaces, auditoriums and rooms for continuous learning programmes. The project budget has an allocation for programming and mobilisation up to 2030. This will allow learning and innovation courses to be conducted at no-cost and provide for communities from outside the vicinity to attend without having to incur transportation costs. Programming will also promote teaching volunteerism which will allow those with skills and knowledge to give back to the community.
    • The facility will also include co-working spaces, maker spaces and mentoring programmes which is intended to help Malaysian start-up companies and students.
    • The rainforest education centre which is a part of the park will promote learning and appreciation of the Malaysian rainforests

    Tourism

    • Whilst the Taman Tugu Project is targeted for the Malaysian public, it will be attractive to foreigners alike. The park which emphasises Malaysian rainforest trees and the rainforest education centre will enable tourists especially short-stay visitors to discover the Malaysian rainforest without having to leave the city. F&B outlets in the park which will only serve authentic Malaysian food will also allow tourists to experience our local cuisine.
    • The connectors from KL Sentral to Taman Botani Perdana and Museum Negara will also make it much easier for tourists commuting via KL Sentral to access the various cultural and heritage sites in the vicinity including Taman Burung, Taman Rama-rama, Planetarium Negara, Muzium Kesenian Islam as well as Muzium Negara and Taman Botani.

    Economic

    • The Taman Tugu Project is a not-for-profit corporate social responsibility (“CSR”) initiative which intends to contribute to the overall quality of living in Kuala Lumpur hence does not have direct economic returns. Nonetheless, from our analysis, it will be attractive to tourists especially considering the eco-tourism element to it and the fact that it connects the various cultural and heritage sites better. On a conservative basis, if it results in just 10% of tourists to Kuala Lumpur staying an extra ½-a-day, the multiplier effect to the economy will be approximately RM400million. This means that the project will pay for itself in less than 2-years.

  10. How will contracts be awarded for the Taman Tugu Project?

    Award of all construction contracts will be conducted via a tender process which adheres to strict corporate governance principles. As the project lead, Khazanah Nasional Berhad will be administering this process and will be taking a similar approach to procurement guidelines as applied by all its companies. More information on the tenders will be shared in the coming months.

  11. What is the role of MNS and FRIM in the Taman Tugu Project?

    As outlined in Question 1, Taman Tugu is an initiative led by Khazanah Nasional Berhad in partnership with DBKL with the support of various stakeholders including Ministry of the Federal Territories, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Tourism and Culture, EPU, UKAS, FRIM and MNS.

    MNS and FRIM’s role is specifically with regards to all conservation efforts. This entails conducting an audit of the existing trees on site, ensuring these trees are preserved and developing the reforestation and replanting strategy, including identification of tree species which are to be transplanted on the Taman Tugu park site. Additionally, MNS will be providing subject matter expertise for the development of the Rainforest Education Centre based on their experience with various environmental education and awareness initiatives.