Balau Laut

Balau Laut

Nama saintifik: Shorea glauca
Nama keluarga: Dipterocarpacea

Balau Laut trees in Taman Tugu
The Balau Laut tree is an indigenous rainforest tree that are amongst the 4,100 trees added to the Taman Tugu site, selected in collaboration with Forest Research Institute of Malaysia (“FRIM”) and Malaysian Nature Society (“MNS”). This is one of the species being added which is considered as ‘Endangered’ on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (“IUCN”) Red List of Threatened Species due to logging for its timber and deforestation.

Physical Features
The Balau Laut tree is a medium-sized evergreen tree growing up to 20 – 30m tall. The cylindrical bole is branchless for 18-27m and can grow up to 120-160cm in diameter and with prominent buttresses. The leaves ovate to lanceolate, thin, with 7-10 pairs of secondary veins hardly raised beneath, lower surface glaucous. The petals of the flowers are short, elliptical-oblong, stamens c. 60, with barbate appendages. The fruit calyx lobes are unequal.

Usage
The wood is an internationally important timber tree. It is a commercially valuable hardwood used for flooring, boxes and crates, heavy carpentry. The species is also tapped for Dammar resin. Dammar is a hard resin, obtained from various trees of Southeast Asia. Traditionally, it is used for purposes such as caulking boats and baskets, as an adhesive, a medicine, as a fuel for torches and sometimes in foods.
 
Habitat
These tropical trees grow in lowland evergreen forest, also on hills and on rocky promontories, ridges and slopes near the coast. These trees are native to Malaysia, Indonesia, and Thailand.