Fig

Fig

Scientific name: Ficus magnoleaefolia
Family name: Moraceae

Fig trees in Taman Tugu
The Fig tree is an indigenous rainforest tree that are amongst the 4,100 trees added to the Taman Tugu site, selected in collaboration with Forest Research Institute of Malaysia (“FRIM”) and Malaysian Nature Society (“MNS”).

Physical Features
Ficus magnoliifolia is a tree with a rather narrow crown that can grow as tall as 45m. The bole is up to 80cm in diameter with prominent plank buttresses up to 2m high.
Fig trees have a unique form of fertilization, each species relying on a single, highly specialized species of wasp that is itself totally dependent upon that fig species in order to breed. The trees produce three types of flower; male, a long-styled female and a short-styled female flower, often called the gall flower. All three types of flower are contained within the structure we usually think of as the fruit. In order to support a population of its pollinator, individuals of a Ficus species must flower asynchronously.

Usage
The tree is harvested from the wild for local use as a source of low quality wood, but is used for temporary construction, mouldings, interior work, fruits crates etc. The wood is also used for fuel.
 
Habitat
The Fig tree can be found in areas and countries through out East Asia such as the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Philippines. This tree generally prefers lowland and submontane forests.